Friday, 17 November 2017

Wine Lover's Kitchen Review, Recipe and Giveaway

A lovely cookery book arrived whilst I was away on holiday in Jamaica. Wine Lover's Kitchen by Fiona Beckett is a stunning collection of recipes featuring one of the nations most loved alcoholic beverage, wine.  Fiona is one of the nations leading and authoritative voices in food and drink, having published an impressive  23 books and is the current wine columnist for The Guardian.
I enjoy drinking a lovely glass of of wine, whether it's a rich full bodied red wine,  fruity white wine, crisp prosecco and my current favourite, mulled wine. But cooking with it, I'm not so sure,  I occasionally add a glug of red wine to stews, chili con carne and the like but that's about it. Wine Lovers Kitchen features a number of inspiring innovative recipes where wine is featured from starters to desserts. Retailing at £12, this book contains 70 recipes, many with accompanying photos. 
Having had a a thorough read of his book I would say it isn't aimed for beginner cooks, but for the more confident and ambitious cook. 


Wine Lovers Kitchen is split into the following chapters:

Wine - the magic ingredient discussing the benefits of wine. 
10 things you need to know about cooking with wine
Soups, Salads and Appetisers: Recipes to try include: Smoked Duck, Mandarin and Pecan Salad with Pinot Noir, Warm Scallop Salad with Crispy Pancetta and Parsnip Chips and Luxury Cheese Fondue.
Pasta and Grains: Stand out recipes include: Rigatoni with Aubergine, Sausage and Zinfandel Sauce, Wild Mushroom and Champagne Risotto and Beetroot and Pinot Risotto. 
Fish and Seafood: Recipes to try include: Moules Marinieres with Muscadet, Quick Tiger Prawns with Pinot Grigio, Fresh Tomato and Basil and Roast Monkfish with Pancetta, Rosemary and Red Wine Gravy. 
Meat and Poultry: Stand out recipes include: Burgundy-style pork with white wine and mustard, sauce, Slow-braised lamb shanks with red wine, rosemary and garlic, Venison Sausages with Red Wine and Rosemary Gravy,  Entrecôte Marchand de Vin and Pepper-crusted steak with Red Wine Sauce. 
Vegetable Dishes and Pulses: Recipes to try include: Vignarole (spring vegetable stew), Fennel and Parmesan Sourdough Gratin and Courgettes and Mushrooms a la Grecque. 
Sauces, Butters and Relishes: Stand out recipes include: Plum and Pinot Jam, Apricot and Moscatel Relish and Roast Chicken Salad.
Sweet Things and Baking: Recipes to try include: Red Wine and Cherry Ripple Ice Cream, Super Boozy Christmas Fruit Cake, Roasted Pears with Sweet Wine, Honey and Pin Nuts and Red Wine and Chocolate Frosted Cake. 

So far, I've made the Entrecôte Marchand De Vin but have booked marked many more recipes.



Recipe for Entrecote Marchand De Vin
Ingredients
2 entrecote or sirloin steaks (225g/8oz each)
1 tbsp olive oil
40g tablespoons butter, softened
2 shallots, very finely chopped
125ml cup good quality red wine, such as Bordeaux or Shiraz
2 rounded tablespoons freshly chopped flat parsley 
sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
sautéed potatoes and a mixed leaf salad, to serve

Method
Pat the steaks dry with paper towels. Heat a heavy-based frying pan/skillet over a medium to high heat for about 2 minutes. Add the olive oil, when it is hot, add 15g of butter. Wait until the foaming subsides, then put the steaks in the pan. Cook for 3 minutes, then turn and cook for another 2-3 minutes for a medium-rare steak. Transfer to a warm plate and cover lightly with aluminium foil.
Discard the fat in the pan and add half the remaining butter. Once it has melted, add the shallots and cook over a low heat for about 2 minutes. 
Increase the heat, pour in the wine and let bubble away for 2-3 minutes until it has reduced by about two thirds. Gradually whisk the remaining butter, pour in any juices that have accumulated under the steak and stir, Season with salt and pepper , then add the parsley. 
Serve the steaks with the sauce poured over, accompanied by sautéed potatoes and a mixed salad leaves.


The lovely people at Ryland Peters and Smalls are giving one lucky reader a copy or the Wine Lovers Kitchen. 

  • Follow the instructions on the Rafflecopter widget. 
  • Join my blog and leave a comment (click on the left hand corner of the right side of the website using Google Friend Connector) this is an ESSENTIAL REQUIREMENT. 
  • For additional entries like my Facebook page, follow me on Twitter, Instagram and Google Plus.
  • All entries will be checked and verified. 
  • Rafflecopter will pick a winner at random.
  • The competition will run from 17.11.17 - 15.12.17
  • Winners will need to respond within 5 working days of being contacted.
  • The competition is open to UK residents, aged 18 or over. 
  • Ryland Peters and Small will post a copy of the book. 
  • Please feel free to share the giveaway. 

  a Rafflecopter giveaway
Share:

Saturday, 11 November 2017

Brownie Pudding

I'm a sucker for any pudding which contains chocolate. Smooth, rich and gooey, this brownie pudding is perfect for tantalising your taste buds. I found this incredibly easy to make and even easier to eat. This brownie pudding is more gooey that a normal chocolate brownie and would go well with custard, for those crisp winter nights. 

Brownie Pudding

Brownie Pudding

Recipe from The Hummingbird Bakery, Life is Sweet.

Makes 23x32cm (9x13in) tin, to scoop or serve as desired.

For the pudding
245g plain flour
3 1/2 tsp baking powder
3/4 tsp salt
295g caster sugar
30g cocoa powder
250ml evaporated milk
2tsp vanilla extract
50g butter
200g chopped pecans

For the topping
275g soft light brown sugar
60g cocoa powder
750ml hot water (boil then let cool slightly)

Method
Preheat the oven to 175C (350f), Gas mark 4. Grease the tin with butter. To make the pudding, whisk together the flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and cocoa in a bowl.
Using a freestanding electric mixer with a paddle attachment or a hand held electric whisk, beat the evaporated milk, vanilla and melted butter into the dry ingredients until smooth. Fold in the pecans by hand and spread the mixture evenly in the tin.
To make the topping, mix the brown sugar and cocoa together and sprinkle over the mixture in the tin. Pour the hot water over the entire pudding.
Bake for 40-45 minutes before serving.

xxx
Share:

Wednesday, 11 October 2017

Spicy Potato Quiche

I've been on a mission to cook and bake from my almost 200 cookery books this year. The recipe for the Spicy Potato Quiche is from one of the first baking books I brought, Readers Digest Baking Bible. I often visited WH Smith back in 2011 at Birmingham New Street when I was studying for my Masters degree. Flicking through the array of baking recipes I was amazed by the eclectic range of recipes, many were distinctively American, others were incredibly retro and many more, such as this recipe, were very inspiring.  I have probably blogged about quiche and it's variant more so than other savoury bake. The French inspired bake has so many variants, from the simple egg and bacon filling to the more adventurous sort such as this spicy potato and leek variant. I wasn't sure whether the weight of the potato make the quiche heavy as I much prefer a light and airy quiche.





For the pastry

170g plain flour
2 fresh red chillis, seeds removed, finely chopped
2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme
1 egg
80ml sunflower oil
1 tablespoon lukewarm water

For the filling
350g waxy new potatoes
250g leeks, cut into 1 cm slices
65g gruyere cheese
2 tablespoon chopped chives
55g rocket, roughly chopped
2 eggs
150ml milk

Serves 4
Preparation Time: 30 minutes plus 30 minutes resting
Cooking 40-45 minutes

Method
Use a baking tray and a 20cm round, flutter loose-based quiche tin. Sift flour and a pinch of salt into a large bowl. Add the chilli and thyme, then make a well in the centre. Whisk the egg, oil and water and add to the dry ingredients; mix quickly with a fork to make a dough.
Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface; knead briefly just until smooth. Place in a dry bowl, cover with a damp cloth towel and leave to rest about 30 minutes before rolling out.
For the filling, cook potatoes in boiling water for 10-12 minutes or until almost tender. Steam leeks over the potatoes for 6-7 minutes, until tender. Drain thoroughly and leave until cool enough to handle.
Preheat oven to 200C (gas mark 6) and put the baking tray in to heat. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out pastry thinly to line the flan tin. Scatter half the cheese in the case.
Thickly slice the potatoes and toss with the leeks, remaining cheese and chives. Season with salt and pepper. Arrange half the potato and leek mixture in the pastry case. Scatter rocket on top then add the rest of the potato and leek mixture.
Lightly beat eggs in a jug. Heat milk to just below boiling pint then add to the three eggs; whisk gently to combine.
Place tin on the hot baking tray. Pour the warm egg custard into the case. Bake for 10 minutes, then reduce oven temperature to 180C gas mark 4. Bake a further 30-35 minutes or until the filling is lightly set. Leave quiche in the tin for 5 minutes. Serve warm.

xxx
Share:

Friday, 6 October 2017

September Eats 2017

September was another foodtastic month. Visiting restaurants in Birmingham, Dudley, Stafford and Liverpool.

Tinseltown - Birmingham


Harvester - Dudley


Cosy Club - Liverpool






Verso Lounge - Stafford



Share:

Saturday, 30 September 2017

Pasta Infographic

Everyone loves pasta, the Italian classic and what's not to love about pasta. Versatile, economical and delicious, pasta is a firm favourite in British kitchen. But did you know there are so many different varieties there, much more than the favourites such as spaghetti, taglitelle and fussili. The lovely people at Jamie's Italian have created an infographic which shows the different types of pasta and their origin. 

Image courtesy of Google.

Agnolotti 
Stuffed pasta that's similar to ravioli but made with just one piece of pasta that's folded in half. This pasta originating Piedmont. 

Annellini 
Small rings of pasta that's mostly used in soups and broths. Apparently it was inspired by African women the Italian military met during WW1. This pasta originates in Siciliy

Bigoli 
Long, thick spaghetti-like pasta that's traditionally made with buckwheat flour and duck eggs. This pasta originates from Veneto. 

Campanelle
Pasta that's shaped to resemble a bell-like flower. With a hallow centre it is perfect for capturing sauce, this pasta is usually served in a thick sauce and originates from Puglila. 

Cannelloni
Cylindrical pasta stuffed with a filling usually spinach and ricotta or mince. The pasta's popularity took off after Second World War. This pasta originates from Naples.

Cappelletti
A relative of tortellini but more elongated and with a different stuffing. It's usually served as a first course at Christmas in northern Italy, this pasta is from Modena

Caramelle
Stuffed pasta that's similar to cannelloni but shaped like a sweet. Caramelle is often served on festive days or as part of Sunday lunch. Caramelle originates from Parma.

Cavatelli
Small pasta shells that look like miniature hot dog buns, originating from Puglia.

Corzetti 
Large coins of pasta, decorated with a wooden tool. The pattern also helps the pasta hold on to sauce. The pasta originates from Liguria. 

Cuscussu
Cuscussu pasta originates from Sicily and is a pasta which is made by sprinkling water on to a bed of semolina which is stirred until tiny balls of flour are formed. 

Farfalle
The popular bow tie pasta originates from Lombardy and is made from a rectangular sheet that's pinched in the middle and trimmed at the ends with pinking scissors. 

Fusilli
Shaped like a corkscrew and originating from Molise is usually served in a vegetable sauce or seafood. 

Garganelli
Egg-based pasta formed by rolling a flat square into a tube and originates from Romagna. 

Gnocchi
A popular pasta, these soft doughy balls originates from the Middle East and is made from semolina, flour, egg and potato. 

Lasagne
My favourite Italian pasta, originates from Naples and when layered with sauces and other ingredients makes the famous lasagne. 

Penne
My sister's favour, these smooth cylindrical pasta originates from Campania. 

Raviolli
Little square parcels made by pressing two thin layers of fresh pasta together with a filling in the middle, originating from north eastern Italy.

Spaghetti
The most popular pasta in the world, the spaghetti consists of all pasta consumption. The famous spaghetti originates from Sicily. 

Tagliatelle
Originating from Emilia-Romagana, tagliatelle are long flat ribbons of pasta which is thought to have created by a court chef who was inspired by Lucrezia d' Este's hair.

Tortellini
Also originating from Emilia Romagna, this pasta is usually stuffed with meat or cheese. 

In collaboration with Jamie's Italian. 
Share:
© Charlene Flash | All rights reserved.
Blogger Template Designed by pipdig